Elkton – Marriage Capitol of Maryland


18CV83-252

Figure 1.   This small copper alloy band may have once graced the finger of a bride at the King’s Reach Site (18CV83), a late 17th-century tobacco plantation along the Patuxent River in Calvert County.

Love and Valentine’s Day are in the air, and this topic, although popular, seemed timely.  In the early 20th century, the Cecil County town of Elkton became known as the East Coast’s version of England’s Gretna Green.  For all you Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice fans, Gretna Green is where Elizabeth Bennett believed her careless sister Lydia was headed for a quickie wedding with the ne‘er-do-well Colonel Wickham. That trip did not turn out so well for Lydia Bennett, but Elkton was likely the birthplace of many a happy marriage during its quarter century heyday as the wedding capitol of Maryland.

Location and timing played key roles in Elkton becoming an elopement epicenter.  In 1913, Delaware passed mandatory waiting and public notification laws for marriage. Maryland had no such laws in place and Elkton’s location in the northeastern portion of the state made it the county seat closest to a number of major urban areas, like New York and Philadelphia, whose states also had waiting periods. The new Delaware law began twenty-five years of couples arriving by train or streaming south along Route 1 to take advantage of Maryland’s no-wait laws. Continue reading

Advertisements