Train Travel in Comfort Courtesy of the Maulden Perine Pottery


Figure 1.  Stoneware saggar recovered from the Lexington Street pottery of Maulden Perine and William Linton. No fragments that could be positively identified as refractories were recovered from this site.

Figure 1. Stoneware saggar recovered from the Lexington Street pottery of Maulden Perine and William Linton. No fragments that could be positively identified as refractories were recovered from this site.

We are fast headed towards winter with the re-igniting of furnaces and comforts of central heating.  Staying warm is much easier in 2014 than it was even a hundred years ago. Even so, it was possible to gather around the hearth and remain at least moderately warm inside before the wonders of central heating.  But what did people do when they had to travel in the winter months? What means did travelers in coaches and trains have for keeping warm?

The traditional way of keeping hands and feet warm in coaches was the use of lap robes and heated bricks. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, passengers on trains could thank the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, as well as Baltimore potter Maulden Perine, for passenger car designs that included concessions to passenger comfort.  Continue reading

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